Tooth Attrition/Tooth Wear

Tooth attrition

Tooth Attrition is a kind of tooth wear due to grinding between the opposing teeth. It results in loss of tooth structure especially on the occlusal surfaces. Tooth wear is believed as the widespread feature of ageing process. Pathological tooth wear happens due to some dental or skeletal defect at a very little age.

 

dental attrition

 

Too much tooth wear results a lot of oral health complications, together with unappealing and uneven tooth levels, pointy and sharp tooth edges, tooth pain and eventual damage of the teeth all in all. As the harder, external surface of the tooth is worn away, the softer dentin will be bare, speeding up the process.

The Signs and Symptoms of Dental Attrition

  • Loss of tooth structure including a flattening or thinning of the teeth
  • Damage or failure of previous dental restorations.
  • Elevated dental pain because of loss of the enamel layer.
  • Stinging or tender gums.
  • Tooth discoloration as a effect of loss of enamel and revelation of the dentin layer

Symptoms of Tooth Attrition

  • Pain and sensitivity to hot and cold.
  • Loss of occlusal surfaces is observed.
  • Yellow glistening surface come into sight on the tooth surface due to showing layer of dentin.
  • Wear facets are noticed on posterior teeth.
  • Deep bite is common.
  • Altered occlusion due to decreased occlusal vertical dimension.
  • Pain in the temporo mandibular joint because of clenching practice or traumatic bite forces.
  • Effect on the periodontal health.

 

Tooth Attrition

 

Causes of Tooth Attrition

  • Grinding habits like bruxism.
  • Deep bite.
  • Decreased over jet or decreased overlap between the teeth.
  • It could be physiologic reduction that is related with ageing process.
  • Tooth wear due to excess acid reflux.
  • If a person incessantly clenches the teeth.
  • Temporomandibular joint issue.

Treatment for Tooth Attrition

  • The habit breaking appliance is used to stop the habit.
  • If patient grits the teeth involuntarily in night its recommended to wear the night guard.
  • The wear facets are refilled back to get the normal tooth structure.
  • If sensitivity is there the patient is advised to use the desensitizing tooth paste.
  • Make use of  fluoride varnish or adhesive agents.
  • Root canal treatment is the other option to treat the sensitivity.
  • Correct the etiology like deep bite or some skeletal incongruity if there by orthodontic treatment
  • Placement of crowns in cases of severe attrition and damage of tooth structure.

Tooth Abrasion or Tooth Wear

Tooth Abrasion

Are your teeth presenting signs of wearing down? When you gaze at your teeth in the mirror do you witness notches close to the gum line? Do you observe that there is a groove in the region where tooth meet up gums? You could have toothbrush abrasion and you will require to take care of it before it gets worsened.

What Are Dental Abrasions?

A dental abrasion is an asymmetrical wearing down of the tooth’s surface.

The abrasion generally presents itself as a v-shaped notch on the bottom of your tooth. There are a lot of habits and routines that can show the way to dental abrasions. For example:

  • Regularly consuming foods and beverages that have lots of acid
  • Poorly-fitted dental clasps on your dentures
  • Using too much force while brushing your teeth
  • Mouth piercings that scratch your teeth
  • Using a hard-bristle toothbrush on a every day basis

 

dental abrasion


Symptoms of Dental Abrasions

  • Unusual tooth sensitivity to the cold or heat
  • Tiny v-shaped dents on the bottom of your tooth
  • Sore or painful gums
  • Itchy tooth pain

Can your dentist fix toothbrush abrasion?

  • Your dentist can fill the groove that has formed where the tooth meets gum by using a porcelain filling. This filling will patch up the pocket and keep bacteria and food debris from entering it. Toothbrush abrasion will carry on if you do not end brushing your teeth too hard. Eventually, your gums will move away lastingly. One time the gum recedes, they do not grow back and the roots of the damaged tooth turn out to be exposed.

Ways to Prevent Dental Abrasions

You can help prevent future dental abrasions by:

  • Stopping detrimental habits such as nail or object chewing
  • Following dentist’s professional instructions on proper tooth brushing
  • Abstaining from using a large amount of strength when brushing your teeth
  • Making certain your dental appliances have a easy fit
  • Keeping up-to-date on your regular dental checkups