Bone Grafting Procedures for Dental Implants

Bone Grafting

It is not strange for the patient to state for a consultation at the oral surgeon’s office and be clued-up at some point in the conversation that he or she may necessitate a “bone graft” in order to exploit the result of dental implant surgery. While this sounds quiet creepy at first, the fact is that bone grafting in the oral cavity nowadays is a practice, expected and painless process.

Bone Grafting

If you are in view of getting dental implants you are by now on the road to refurbishing your smile. As dental implants are surgically positioned and put in into the jawbone. We give confidence you to visit our dental office for an examination and X-rays so that we can answer this question based on your health.

Why do you have bone loss?

There are many grounds why you may have insufficient bone. Some of the common reasons for bone loss and bone volume deterioration comprise:

  • Periodontal (gum) disease– Periodontal (gum) disease break down gum and bone tissue quite rapidly and the teeth turn out to be loose or unstable as a result.
  • Tooth extraction– If you have had teeth extracted, the space remaining sometimes affects the adjacent teeth and the bone will begin to deteriorate.
  • Infection – Infections in the mouth can show the way to jaw bone loss eventually
  • Injury – Impact to the mouth can show the way to the bone loss.

Bone grafting procedures at Advanced Dental Care Centre

We perform all types of dental bone grafting procedures, including:

  • Sinus lift or subantral  graft
  • Guided bone regeneration
  • The autogenous ramus/Block bone graft or chin graft
  • Ridge modification
  • Ridge preservation
  • Socket preservation/socket graft
  • Nerve Repositioning

 

SINUS LIFT OR SUBANTRAL GRAFT

SUBANTRAL GRAFT

The “Sinus Lift” is a bone-grafting procedure that’s essential when the amount of bone found in a patient’s upper jaw (in the region originally occupied by their bicuspid or molar teeth) is not enough to lodge the length of a dental implant.

  • It’s usually executed in advance of implant placement surgery, so to allocate time for bone healing. But with a number of cases, both procedures may be completed at the same time.

When sinus-lift surgery is required.

They comprise damage to the bone because of a earlier surgical procedure (like a difficult tooth extraction) or the outcome of periodontal (gum) disease.

A common problem merely involves the condition where the size and shape of their maxillary sinus is comparatively large in relationship to the size of their upper jaw and for the reason that of this there is not sufficient bone width in which to insert a implant.

What does the sinus lift procedure do?

When this procedure is executed, a segment of the maxillary sinus is packed in with bone (grafting material). The consequence is a thicker sinus floor into which a tooth implant can then be positioned.

How is the sinus lift procedure performed?

The exact technique that a dentist uses can differ. But usually this surgery has been executed as follows:

  • The dentist will make a cut in the patient’s gum tissue on the cheek side of their upper jaw in the area where the placement of the dental implant is considered.
  • Following making the incision, the dentist will flap ba\ck the patient’s gum tissue and rendering the surface of the jawbone that lies beneath.
  • The uncovered bone is cut in a manner where a “trap door” of bone (hinged at the top) is formed. This movable part of bone is then pressed kindly inward and upward into the sinus cavity.
  • The vacant space under the lifted sinus membrane is then filled with bone-grafting material, thus providing the new bone into which a tooth implant can be positioned.
  • Once the bone-graft material has been placed, the gum tissue flap is sutured back in position.
  • In few cases, it can be doable that the dentist will put the dental implant at the same time that the sinus lift is carried out.

What kind of bone-graft materials are used with the sinus lift process?

Quite a few different types of bone-grafting materials can be employed with sinus lift surgery.

  • In a few cases, the patient’s own bone will be used, such as that taken from a new location in their mouth or else from other bones.
  • In other cases, prepared bone (frozen bone, freeze-dried bone), either human or from another species (i.e. bovine), can be obtained from a tissue bank for use.
  • one more option involves the use of synthetically derivative graft material such as hydroxyapatite.

Socket Preservation/Socket Graft

Socket preservation is a method in which graft material is positioned in the socket of an extracted tooth at the time of extraction in turn to lessen the quantity of bone loss which takes place and protect the area in the mouth which supports the root of the tooth.

Socket preservation/socket graft

Following a tooth extraction the jaw bone in the region where the tooth has been taken out generally lessens in thickness. Socket conservation proceeds to put off the reduction in thickness allowing  a dental implant to be placed. In the incident that socket preservation is not conceded out before the position of an implant Ridge Augmentation surgery will be needed.

An adequate thickness and structure of the jaw bone is essential for implant surgery to be carried out. Socket Preservation is an significant procedure which make certain the structure of the socket is appropriate for implantation. It is also imperative to carry out the process due to any loss in jawbone thickness disturbing the shape of the patient’s facial appearance.

Guided Bone Regeneration  

Devoid of sufficient bone, cosmetic issues, recession of the gums and exposure and loss of the implant may occur. Guided bone regeneration (GBR) is a surgical method where bone is redeveloped by using particulate bone grafting material and a membrane.

GBR uses collagen membranes to hold the growth of new bone inside an area where there is inadequate bone for function, aesthetics or a prosthetic restoration.

GBR helps out the development of hard tissues and is mainly used in the oral cavity to hold up fresh bone growth on an alveolar ridge to permit constancy after the positioning of dental implants. GBR is a dependable procedure, when the dental surgeon has the essential knowledge.

The Autogenous Ramus/Chin Graft or “Block Bone Graft”

Block Bone Graft

There are times when composite materials for example the aforementioned cow bone (BioOss) can only not offer sufficient bulk or effectively put back the amount of bone that is lost after tooth loss. In these cases, it is sometimes needed to lapse to harvesting the patient’s inhabitant bone to aid in a “live bone” replacement of the deficient region. Quite a few possible causes of bone loss make defects major enough to call for this approach. A small number of the most general etiologies comprise:

  • Regions where teeth were extracted with no instant socket graft, tooth re-implantation or implant.
  • An area where a tooth is absent and the nature of the disease linked with the tooth caused wide bone destruction.
  • Areas of the jaw where enduring teeth were congenitally absent and as a result, normal tooth supporting bone fail to grow.
  • Bone gone from dental trauma.

In cases for example this, the most frequently used grafting process is an autogenous graft (harvested from the patient) and is located in the form of a block. Therefore, we have derived the term “autogenous block bone graft.” More frequently than not the block of bone is attained from the lower jaw in the region where the third molars used to exist in. This area is called the mandibular ramus. A substitute location used generally to attain a block of bone is the chin. so, you may find in these cases, your surgeon referring to the require for a “chin” or “ramus” graft.

The procedure involves eradicating a little block of bone (approx. 1 cm square) from both of the two above mentioned sites and moving that bone to the region of bone deficit. The graft is then protected with one or two small screws and overlay with particulate bovine bone and a collagen membrane. The surgical site is firmly clogged and four months is generally given for the graft to combine to the underlying jawbone prior to returning to the region to put an implant. Once the graft is grown-up, the grafted bone will not only accommodate an implant in “live” bone but it will also perform to hold up the soft tissue architecture in a way that is equally cosmetically agreeable and hygienically simple to maintain.

Ridge Preservation

Dental alveolus is the tooth sockets in the jawbone in which the roots of the teeth are located. The ridge of the jawbone where the teeth go into the bone is known as Alveolar Ridge, and the width of this ridge can differ very much from person to person, from 3mm up to 8mm.

In order to put implants in a lean alveolar ridge, the ridge desires to be rip and widened. This sounds terrible, but with a pointed chisel-like hand instrument the external cortex layer of the alveolar ridge can with no trouble be split and broaden by an knowledgeable clinician.

In the majority cases a dental implant can be placed right away after the ridge split, for the reason that the bone grows back into the gap produced and amalgamate with the implant as it would do fairly normally in a straightforward implant placement case.

Ridge Modification:

Malformations   in the upper or lower jaw can leave you with insufficient bone in which to put dental implants. This imperfection may have been caused by periodontal disease, wearing dentures, developmental defects, damage or trauma. Not only does this defect cause problems in inserting the implant, it can also source an unappealing indentation in the jaw line close to the missing teeth that may be hard to clean and retain.

To correct the difficulty, the gum is raised away from the ridge to expose the bony defect. The defect is then packed with bone or bone substitute to upsurge the ridge.

Lastly, the incision is closed and healing is allowable to take place. Depending on your individual needs, the bone generally will be permitted to build up for about four to 12 months previous to implants can be placed. In a number of cases, the implant can be positioned at the same time the ridge is modified.

Ridge modification has been revealed to greatly perk up look and boost your chances for victorious implants that can last for years to come.

Nerve-Repositioning

Nerve Repositioning

The inferior alveolar nerve, which gives sense to the lower lip and chin, may require to be moved in order to make space for positioning of dental implants to the lower jaw. This process is restricted to the lower jaw and indicated when teeth are absent in the region of the two back molars and/or and 2nd premolar.

Nerve Repositioning

  1. An incision is prepared into the Lower Jaw Bone. The Nerve is cautiously pulled outwards and the Dental Implant is fastened into place. Irradiated Bone is added in the region of the Dental Implant to offer more support for the Dental Implant.
    The irradiated Bone will amalgamate with the patient’s own bone over a period of 2-3 months.
  2. A surgical pad (collotape) is positioned in-between the Dental Implant and the Nerve. This offers support and cushioning on the nerve.
  3. Extra Irradiated Bone is added over the nerve for more sustain.
  4. After a time period of 2-3 months curative period, Natural tooth colored porcelain Dental Crowns (or Bridges) is fixed above the Dental Implant.

 

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